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Competitive Effects of Weeds and Beneficial Effects of Mulching on Coconut Seedlings

Authors:

S. U. REMISON ,

COCOS, NG
About S. U.
Physiology Division, Nigerian Institute For Oil Palm Research, P.. M. B. 1030,
Benin, Nigeria.
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G. MGBEZE

NG
About G.
Physiology Division, Nigerian Institute For Oil Palm Research, P.. M. B. 1030,
Benin, Nigeria
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Abstract

Dwarf coconut seedlings were raised in polybags under four mulching treatments
(no mulch, coconut husk, oil palm bunch refuse and grass) and two weeding regimes
(designated Wo and Wl) in the nursery. Weeding was done once every month in Wl
plots whilst Wo plots were left unweeded.
Weed competition reduced the growth of coconut seedlings a great deal and the
unweeded and unmulched plants were not vigorous enough for transplanting. Weeds
reduced dry matter yield of leaves, stem and roots in unmulched plots by 61, 46 and 44%
respectively. Mulching was beneficial and reduced competitive effects of weeds. Mulching
increased plant height, girth and dry matter yield. At harvest, leaves formed the
greatest proportion of the dry matter; the mean being 171.6 g compared with 20.8 and
43.2 g for stem and roots respectively. Soil temperatures were only moderately reduced
by mulching. Coconut husk suppressed weeds the most but oil palm bunch refuse
increased K content of soil more than any other mulch material.

doi: 10.4038/cocos.v5i0.2055

COCOS 1987 Vol.5 No.1 19-27

How to Cite: REMISON, S.U. & MGBEZE, G., (2010). Competitive Effects of Weeds and Beneficial Effects of Mulching on Coconut Seedlings. COCOS. 5, pp.19–27. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/cocos.v5i0.2055
Published on 06 Jul 2010.
Peer Reviewed

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